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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
At lunchtime two days ago, I was driving home along a nearby street when a guy in a Transit van reversed out of a yard on the other side of the road and hit the offside of my car. It was a low-speed impact, but both the doors and their electrics will need replacing, along with the offside front alloy wheel, the body panel above it and most of the trim on that side of the car.

I know that insurers are inclined to write cars off at the drop of a hat these days, so I'm profoundly worried that I'm about to lose my car - and as an extremely tall semi-disabled person who if left carless would have no transport to go car-hunting in and who can barely even walk now (let alone to the nearest bus station), I'll be left feeling the negative effect of the Transit-driver's behaviour to a far keener degree than an able-bodied, normally-shaped person would. Basically I'm facing losing my legs if I lose my car. And it was an immaculate, super-low-mileage, one-previous-owner car too, which I was extremely lucky to find in the first place.

If it looks as if the car's going to be written off, is there any way in which I myself can step in and offer to top up the maximum amount that an insurer would be prepared to pay out for its repair under these circumstances? I really love my 1.5 dCi with its high seat, its zero road tax and its all-round mintness - and besides, I can't even survive 48 hours without a car now - so I'm left wondering if I can avert the whole unnecessary business of my car being officially listed as a write-off, when 95% of it is still in sound order and concourse condition. I'd certainly be prepared to consider throwing in a couple of thousand myself if I thought it would save my car and enable it to have a decent life in spite of the cretin in the Transit van.

And is there anyone here present who might have a shrewd idea just how much it'd be likely to cost an insurer to sort out the damage I've described?

Thanks to y'all.
 

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There’s two ways to approach this, one is to offer to pay the difference for the repair costs with your insurance company ,but get the quote from the garage that has your car.

The second is to ask that garage to source used parts to fix the car.

You need to find out the full extent of damages, damaged cars have a damage rating,some can be repaired others will affect insurance renewals.
 

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Very sorry to read what has happened.
You should not be left out of pocket. Because it's the other driver's fault, they should pay to get your car fixed so you need to be able to argue the value of your car is "enhanced" from "book value" due to its low mileage, good condition etc. Scour the internet for adverts of cars in similar age and condition to back your claims up about how much it is worth. Are you insured through a broker - if so, get them to earn their commission by pressing the other insurers to pay out for full repair costs. Hopefully they will not write it off
 

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Very sorry to read what has happened.
You should not be left out of pocket. Because it's the other driver's fault, they should pay to get your car fixed so you need to be able to argue the value of your car is "enhanced" from "book value" due to its low mileage, good condition etc. Scour the internet for adverts of cars in similar age and condition to back your claims up about how much it is worth. Are you insured through a broker - if so, get them to earn their commission by pressing the other insurers to pay out for full repair costs. Hopefully they will not write it off
HI,sorry to hear about your bad news ,do NOT give to any one your keys ,etc untill you have agreed a deal with your insurer`s as till that point it`s still your car.
Also look at HONEST JOHN.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Many thanks for the thoughts which have been kindly aired so far. Much appreciated.

ggboy, I regret to say that I don't actually have my car's keys at the moment.The car had to be taken away on a low loader to a damage assessment workshop twenty miles north of here and they needed the keycard for moving the car around, accessing the interior, testing the steering and whatnot. Whether I shall ever see the keycard again (let alone the car) if the insurers decide to write the vehicle off, I have no idea, which is depressing.

dick, thanks for the pointers. What worries me in particular is not knowing at what point a car is officially listed on some register or other as a write-off. If that happens before the insurer even recontacts me, I'm guessing it could be very difficult to get the car taken back off the register again. But I'll certainly let the insurers know that (in theory) I'm up for plugging any funding gap, as long as it's not too huge, and thank you for mentioning the repairing-with-used-parts concept - though how long it'd take the workshop to locate the parts is anyone's guess, even if they do use that kind of supplier regularly. But for a start, I do have a second-hand Captur alloy wheel at home, which'd definitely save paying out £235 for a brand new one.

Ivor, I'm glad to be able to say that one of the first things that happened after I phoned my claim in was that an outfit called ServiceCertainty got me to upload a bunch of damage photos to their website - and they also requested a snap of my mileage display, so hopefully the low mileage is already being borne in mind as a significant factor. Sadly though, I didn't buy my insurance through a conventional broker, just through a price-comparison site from which I followed a link to my insurer's site, so it looks as if there's no-one to fight my corner for me. I've a sneaking feeling though that if I quoted various carefully-researched dealer prices for similarly low-mileage cars, in the hope of getting the insurer to reconsider the value of my Captur, they'd probably just say that the car's value is only what a dealer would be prepared to pay me for it. But I do agree wholeheartedly that if an incompetent motorist is responsible for wrecking my car, there's no rational reason on earth why his insurers shouldn't pay the entire cost of the repair job or else source me an identical car in good mechanical order. If they won't do that, then what exactly are we paying our own insurers for? To cut some sort of a deal with the other party's insurers? I think not. What would be comprehensive about that?

DSC00118 15% 2.jpg

[In happier times....]
 

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If you can get the other driver to admit to the accident and recover your excess from them your insurance should not go up next year as much.

Your legal cover if you have taken the addition cover out should recover this for you

You should find it easy to obtain used parts from many online dismantlers, don’t forget some Renault parts can take up to 6 week to obtain from renault.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yes, I took out legal cover, dick, though to tell you the truth I'd forgotten all about it. Not sure how exactly that'll affect things though. But better with than without, I suppose.

The insurers gave me a Fiesta as a courtesy car, but after a week it had half crippled me because I'm 6'5" with arms and legs long enough for a man of 6'8", so today I've switched it for a Mokka, which creates the illusion of spaciousness inside but still looks like crippling me because the ergonomics are all wrong for a tall person. I really am pining for me Captur - the only car that I can fit into properly.

Not sure how the third party is going to conduct himself, but at least it was a company vehicle that did the damage, not a private one, so perhaps the company has a straight bat. One can only hope.
 

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It’s important that you ask to speak to the legal team, your information will not have been passed to them.

In order for you not to get loaded on renewal you should be requesting your legal cover team to recover your policy excess from the other party, and any out of pocket expenses you have incurred .

It’s really good that you took out the legal cover.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Well, the damage assessors' workshop contacted me to say that the insurers had authorised the repair of my Captur. I checked with my own insurers and was told that the whole incident is being treated as a No Fault claim, so I won't have to lose my excess either (or have to get a lawyer to claw it back for me).

Phew. Am I relieved.

But I won't be relaxing until I know the car is 100% good as new and that it's not about to do anything unpleasant like get through a new set of tyres every four months due to unaddressed wheel-bearing/axle irregularities.

Maaaan, will I be glad to get the old crate back. I've got to drive 100 miles in that spine-snapping Vauxhall Mokka tomorrow and may well be dead by the end of the trip. Make a mental note never to be 6'5" tall - it's definitely not a smart move.

Thanks for your help and support, shipmates.
 

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Happy that you appear to have got a positive outcome. If you are really concerned when you get the car back, you could always pay for an independent examination and report, letting them know why you want it. See if you can get insurance included in case they miss anything, so if something untoward does happen as a result of the repairs not being fully correct, you have some comeback. It may be worth it for peace of mind, if you are that concerned.
I have my fingers crossed for you; good luck.
 

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Well, the damage assessors' workshop contacted me to say that the insurers had authorised the repair of my Captur. I checked with my own insurers and was told that the whole incident is being treated as a No Fault claim, so I won't have to lose my excess either (or have to get a lawyer to claw it back for me).

Phew. Am I relieved.

But I won't be relaxing until I know the car is 100% good as new and that it's not about to do anything unpleasant like get through a new set of tyres every four months due to unaddressed wheel-bearing/axle irregularities.

Maaaan, will I be glad to get the old crate back. I've got to drive 100 miles in that spine-snapping Vauxhall Mokka tomorrow and may well be dead by the end of the trip. Make a mental note never to be 6'5" tall - it's definitely not a smart move.

Thanks for your help and support, shipmates.
Hi, thats great glad for you,good idea about the inspection,could be worth paying for just for peace of mind.
 

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Looked up "no fault" insurance claim to see exactly what it was. Apparently if you haven't protected your no claims you can still lose some of it and many insurance companies will load you premium at renewal time because,so they say,"a NO FAULT claim driver is more likely to have an AT FAULT claim in the future". I sh*t you not.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
'a NO FAULT claim driver is more likely to have an AT FAULT claim in the future'.

The human race just never fails to disappoint, had you noticed? I've reached 60 years of age without ever being in an accident of any kind or claiming on any sort of insurance policy in my life....and yet the insurance trade reckons I'm now more likely to have an at-fault accident than I was before a numpty reversed a van into my car. Can you follow their logic? 'Cos I know I can't.

I was already a very careful and cautious driver - and the collision has made me even more wary of the stupidity of my fellow road-users and therefore even more cautious....and yet apparently that now means I'm more likely to cause an accident of my own.

It's enough to make you go out and buy four separate dashcams for front, back, left and right.

Honestly.

Thanks again to you all for your advice and positive wishes. Hopefully this thread will be useful to other folk who finds themselves in a crunch through no fault of their own.
 

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^
It's just the insurance industry's way of screwing even higher premiums out of us. Suppose your car was parked legally and nobody was in it, and it was hit by a drunk driver. The logic, if you can call it that, the insurance industry uses is that you will now be more likely to be involved in another claim. They're crazy but get away with it as there's no way to challenge them using common sense
 
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