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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

How everyone is doing?
I bought a captur petrol Tdc and I understand its engine oil is 5W-40. But while searching online, there are additional parameters such as, of Evolution brand, there are two types of 5W-40 which are 900 and 900 FT.
I was wondering what those numbers mean ?
Thank you in advance.
 

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According to the technical data sheets, 900 has an international specifications API: SG/CD, and 900FT is SN/CF. You can find a bit more about the API specs here Oil Specifications Explained - What does 10w40 mean? (driverstechnology.co.uk)
The 900 has a slightly higher viscosity at elevated temps, and complies with later specifications. I don't know what the price difference is but I would go for the 900. Don't feel you have to use Elf. That was just a Renault sponsorship deal (don't they recommend Castrol or something else now?)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks dude, in a related question, the seller is asking if my car jas Particle Filter and I dont know that ( its capture TDC 120, nov, 2013) . Is there a relation between particle filter and engine oil type or I can buy any 5W-40 ? thanks in advance.
 

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It should have a particle filter, or DPF or FAP. Maybe even a sticker somewhere like this

821


A modern spec 5W-40 should say "suitable for diesel engines" on the packaging. Many also say suitable for particulate filters. Worth checking. Some older specs might not be suitable.
 

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While it will not have a DPF it may well have a PPF (Petrol Particulate Filter). DPFs were made mandatory in 2010 for all diesel engines. PPFs are mandatory from 2018 for all petrol engines, but many manufacturers introduced them earlier to comply with EU engine standards. PPF are smaller than DPF (typically holding 1 gram of carbon as opposed to 8 grams for DPF) but burn the carbon off much faster as petrol engines run considerably hotter than diesels. PPF are, as a result, far less prone to clogging than DPF if used generally over short journeys. The consequence of this is that combustion related particulates are a diminishing element of road particulates. These are now made up mainly of particles from wearing surfaces (clutch, brakes, tyres) and means that petrol, diesel, hybrid and electric are all contributing (and - say it quietly - so are cyclists).
 

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GDI engines are the guilty party,offering better fuel efficiency at the expense of producing exhaust particulates.
 
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